articles and blurbs go here

"Staying Clean" a place to share how you stay clean or got clean

articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Mon Mar 07, 2011 1:00 am

Supporting and helping other peeps

1. Believe in Them
We all have self-doubts from time to time. Our confidence is shaken. We lack the faith in our talents and skills to go for an important promotion or launch a new initiative. Having someone believe in you at these times is priceless. The stories of great men and women are saturated with examples of someone who believed in them even when they didn't fully believe in themselves.

2. Encourage Them
"You can do it." "I know you can." These are words that are all-too-infrequently voiced. Sincere encouragement can go a long way in helping someone stay the course. The more specific you are, the better the results. "I remember when you got through your slump last year and ended up winning the sales contest. I'm willing to bet that you'll do even better this time."

3. Expect a Lot
We're often told not to get our hopes up. We're encouraged to have REALISTIC expectations. But when it comes to helping others operate at their best, we sometimes have to up-level our expectations. This can be taken to extremes, but there are many times when a teacher, a parent or even a boss has required more of us than we thought we were capable. And we've risen to the challenge which enabled us to see further than before.

4. Tell the Truth
And tell it with compassion. We often avoid telling the hard truth because we don't want to upset anyone. We want to be NICE. But telling the truth is a loving act. You may be the only person who can or will say to another what needs to be said. And you can confront someone without being combative.

5. Be a Role Model
One of the best ways we influence is by our own actions. Who we are speaks much more loudly than what we say. Don't think that people aren't watching you. They are. And they're registering everything about you consciously and unconsciously. We automatically emulate our role models. And we're ALL role models to someone so let's be good ones.

6. Share Yourself
Too often, we miss the value of sharing our failings. We don't want to be vulnerable so we hold back. In doing so, we deprive others of our experience, our learning and our humanity. When you share from your own experience - especially your failures - you increase empathy, you're more approachable and you increase your relatability to others.

7. Challenge Them
The word "challenge" has some negative connotations. The meaning we're using here is, "a test of one's abilities or resources in a demanding but stimulating undertaking." We all need to be challenged from time to time. Doing it for another is an art form. Go too far and it will backfire. Go too easy and you will appear patronizing. Remind people of their commitment to being their best and state your challenge. "I challenge you to overcome these unimportant opinions and get on with the real task at hand, get the job done, make the commitment, etc."

8. Ask Good Questions
A good therapist or coach doesn't tell their clients what to do. They ask good questions in order for the client to understand themselves better, to get clear on what the issue is and from there to make good choices. You can do the same. By asking elegant questions, you cause people to think and come up with solutions. They'll appreciate it.

9. Acknowledge Them
You find what you're looking for. If you're looking for the best in someone, you'll see it. If you're looking for their failings, you'll see those. Catch people doing things right and tell them. When we acknowledge the good deeds of others, they tend to do more of them. Write a note. Send a card. Give them a call. Praise them in front of others.

10. Spend Time with Them
We love what we give our time to. By devoting your most precious resource (time) to another individual, you're showing them that you truly value them and your relationship with them. Invest time in your relationships; it's what life is made of.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Mon Mar 07, 2011 1:03 am

Natural Recovery From Addiction Beyond the 12 Steps
Submitted by Misc Author Tue 09/16/2008
Granfield, Robert and William Cloud; The Elephant that No One Sees: Natural Recovery Among Middle-Class Addicts; Journal of Drug Issues; Winter96, Vol. 26 Issue 1; p45

One population that remains hidden due to the fact that they deviate from socially constructed categories regarding addiction are middle-class drug addicts and alcoholics who terminate their addictive use of substances without treatment.

Research exploring the phenomena of natural recovery has found that significant numbers of people discontinue their excessive intake of addictive substances without formal or lay treatment.

While it is difficult to estimate the actual size of this hidden population because they are largely invisible (Lee 1993), researchers agree that their numbers are large (Goodwin et al. 1971) and some even contend that they are substantially larger than those choosing to enter treatment facilities or self-help groups (Sobell et al. 1993; Peele 1989; Biernacki 1986).

Some have estimated that as many as 90% of problem drinkers never enter treatment and many suspend problematic use without it (Hingson et ai. 1980; Roizen et al. 1978; Stall and Biernacki 1986). Research in Canada has shown that 82% of alcoholics who terminated their addiction reported using natural recovery (Sobell et al. 1993).

While the sample within the present study is small, there is considerable evidence from additional research to suggest that the population of self-healers is quite substantial (Sobell et al. 1992; Waldorf et al. 1991).

Despite empirical evidence, many in the treatment field continue to deny the existence of such a population.

The therapeutic "field" possesses considerable power to construct reality in ways that exclude alternative and perhaps challenging paradigms.

As Bourdieu (1991) has recently pointed out, such fields reproduce themselves through their ability to normalize arbitrary world views. The power of the therapeutic field lies in its ability to not only medicalize behavior, but also in the ability to exclude the experiences and world views of those who do not fit into conventional models of addiction and treatment (Skoll 1992).

Finding empirical support for natural recovery does not imply that we devalue the importance of treatment programs or even self-help groups.

Such programs have proven beneficial to addicts, particularly those in advanced stages.

However, the experiences of our respondents have important implications for the way in which addiction and recovery are typically conceptualized.

First, denying the existence of this population, as many do, discounts the version of reality held by those who terminate their addictions naturally. Natural recovery is simply not recognized as a viable option. This is increasingly the case as media has reified dominant notions of addiction and recovery.

Similarly, there is an industry of self-help literature that unquestionably accepts and reproduces these views. Denying the experience of natural recovery allows treatment agencies and self-help groups to continue to impose their particular view of reality on society.

Related to this is the possibility that many of those experiencing addictions may be extremely reluctant to enter treatment or attend self-help meetings. Their resistance may stem from a variety of factors such as the stigma associated with these programs, discomfort with the therapeutic process, or lack of support from significant others. Whatever the reason, such programs do not appeal to everyone.

For such people, natural recovery may be a viable option. Since natural recovery demystifies the addiction and recovery experience, it may offer a way for people to take control of their own lives without needing to rely exclusively on experts. Such an alternative approach offers a low-cost supplement to an already costly system of formal addiction treatment.

A third implication concerns the consequences of adopting an addict identity. While the disease metaphor is thought to be a humanistic one in that it allows for the successful social reintegration of deviant drinkers or drug users, it nevertheless constitutes a deviant identity. Basing one's identity on past addiction experiences may actually limit social reintegration.

The respondents in our sample placed a great deal of emphasis on their immediate social roles as opposed to constantly referring to their drug-addict pasts. Although there is no way of knowing, such present-centeredness may, in the long run, prove more beneficial than a continual focusing on the past.

Fourth, for drug and alcohol treatment professionals, as well as those who are likely to refer individuals to drug and alcohol treatment programs, this research raises several important considerations. It reaffirms the necessity for individual treatment matching (Lewis et al. 1994).

It also suggests that individuals whose profiles are similar to these middle-class respondents are likely to be receptive to and benefit from less intrusive, short-term types of interventions.

Given the extent of the various concerns expressed by these respondents around some of the possible long-term negative consequences of undergoing traditional treatment and related participation in self-help programs, the decision to specifically recommend drug and alcohol treatment is a profoundly serious one.

It should not be made capriciously or simply because it is expected and available. A careful assessment of the person's entire life is warranted, including whether or not the condition is so severe and the absence of supportive resources so great that the possible lifelong identity of addict or related internalized beliefs are reasonable risks to take in pursuing recovery.

Overall, the findings of this study as well as previous research on natural recovery could be instructive in designing more effective treatment programs (Sobell etal. 1992; Fillmore 1988; Stall and Biernacki 1986).

Finally, the experiences of our respondents may have important social policy implications. If our respondents are any guide, the following hypothesis might be considered: those with the greatest number of resources and who consequently have a great deal to lose by their addiction are the ones most likely to terminate their addictions naturally.

While addiction is not reducible to social class alone, it is certainly related to it (Waldorf et al. 1991). The respondents in our sample had relatively stable lives: they had jobs, supportive families, high school and college credentials, and other social supports that gave them reasons to alter their drug-taking behavior. Having much to lose gave our respondents incentives to transform their lives.

However, when there is little to lose from heavy alcohol or drug use, there may be little to gain by quitting. Social policies that attempt to increase a person's stake in conventional life could not only act to prevent future alcohol and drug addiction, they could also provide an anchor for those who become dependent on these substances.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Mon Mar 07, 2011 1:36 am

Alcoholics Anonymous challenged to take part in an open debate

Murdoch and Lilian MacDonald, two former alcoholics from Ayrshire in Scotland, have issued a challenge to Alcoholics Anonymous to take part in an open debate in the media about alcoholism and AA’s 12-Step programme.

“Firstly, Alcoholics Anonymous is wrong,” Murdoch and Lilian say. “Alcoholism is not a progressive, incurable disease or illness which alcoholics are born with. It is a behaviour problem, a response to dysfunctional childhood.

“Alcoholics are not addicted to alcohol. They are addicted to the escape that alcohol affords. Escape from life, or certain aspects of life which they find too difficult or too painful to cope with, or the associated feelings that go with not coping. Alcohol is a quick fix, and addiction means an habitual response or repetitive behaviour.”

In the first step of the programme, Alcoholics Anonymous members are told that they “powerless over alcohol” and that therefore there is nothing they can do about it but accept lifelong abstinence. But Murdoch and Lilian have proved that the opposite is true and that there‘s a lot that alcoholics can do for themselves.

They believe that everybody is capable of changing their behaviour. They say: “If, as we did, alcoholics choose to identify and to address their issues from the past, or, alternatively, simply take a more mature attitude of responsibility for their behaviour and learn to deal with their life, most will be able drink responsibly once again if and when they so wish.

“Advocating lifelong abstinence from alcohol on the other hand is merely treating the symptom rather than the underlying problem, and is just a damage-limitation exercise.”

Murdoch and Lilian’s second point is that Alcoholics Anonymous is not effective.

According to both an independent US government survey and AA’s own membership surveys, AA-style treatment works for only 5% of its participants.

And a report published by the prestigious Cochrane Collaboration says: “The available experimental studies did not demonstrate the effectiveness of AA or other 12-step approaches in reducing alcohol use and achieving abstinence compared with other treatments,” although they say further research is needed.

Moreover. leading American addiction expert Dr Stanton Peele shows that most sufferers from all so-called addictions, including alcoholism, mature out of their dependence without any intervention whatsoever, and in the case of alcoholism, a sizeable proportion of them are able to drink normally again.

The third point of Lilian and Murdoch’s challenge is that Alcoholics Anonymous is dogmatic, inflexible and impervious to change.

“Any normal organisation would be open to new ideas,” they say, “and would welcome discussion and change as new discoveries and progress are made in the field of alcoholism.

“Unfortunately AA has adopted a cult-like attitude, and regards its so-called programme of recovery as set in stone forever. No changes have been made or even allowed in more than 70 years of its existence, and no questioning or discussion is tolerated.”

The waters are further muddied, Murdoch and Lilian say, by the fact that AA’s 12-Step Programme is borrowed from an early 19th century American evangelical movement, with half of the twelve steps mentioning God.

Interestingly, all American courts have ruled that government agencies cannot encourage or support AA or 12-step treatment, since their religious basis violates the First Amendment’s ban against state support of religion.

And the status quo has been perpetuated by private rehab clinics that have piggybacked AA and hijacked its 12-Step programme for their own profit. Profit that is maximised by using a ready-made one size fits all prescription instead of providing individual treatment for individual people.

So Murdoch and Lilian conclude that a completely new organisation may be the only solution if Alcoholics Anonymous remains unwilling to embrace change and progress. They say that AA’s absolute refusal to accept change that is already happening is their greatest weakness.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Something to start doing

Postby cheeps » Wed Mar 16, 2011 3:33 pm

Compassion meditation involves silently repeating certain phrases that express the intention to move from judgment to caring, from isolation to connection, from indifference or dislike to understanding. You don't have to force a particular feeling or get rid of unpleasant or undesirable reactions; the power of the practice is in the wholehearted gathering of attention and energy, and concentrating on each phrase. You can begin with a 20-minute session and increase the time gradually until you are meditating for half an hour at a time. If your mind wanders, don't be concerned. Notice whatever has captured your attention, let go of the thought or feeling, and simply return to the phrases. If you have to do that over and over again, it is fine.


* To begin, take a comfortable position. You may want to sit in a chair or on cushions on the floor (just make sure your back is erect without being strained or overarched). You can also lie down. Take a few deep, soft breaths to let your body settle.
* Closing your eyes or leaving them slightly open, start by thinking of someone you care about already—perhaps she's been good or inspiring to you. You can visualize this person or say her name to yourself, get a feeling for her presence, and silently offer phrases of compassion to her. The typical phrases are: "May you be free of pain and sorrow. May you be well and happy." But you can alter these, or use others that have personal significance.
* After a few minutes, shift your attention inward and offer the phrases of compassion to yourself: "May I be free of pain and sorrow. May I be well and happy."
* Then, after some time, move on to someone you find difficult. Get a feeling for the person's presence, and offer the phrases of compassion to her.
* Then turn to someone you've barely met—the supermarket checkout woman or UPS man. Even without knowing his or her name, you can get a sense of the person, perhaps an image, and offer the phrases of compassion.
* We close with the offering of compassion to people everywhere, to all forms of life, without limit, without exception: "May all beings be free of pain and sorrow. May all be well and happy."
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Tue Nov 01, 2011 9:45 pm

This post I found at another site....it addresses how he dealt with quitting drugs.


Oct 21th, 2010
"Me and my girlfriend have been addicted to vicodin/hydrocodone for about 4-5 years. We've tried to quit times before but without success. This time we planned it out and so far are doing good. We've been quit for 2.5 weeks now and are for the most part very strong mentally but sometimes in the evening after work and on the weekends, when we would normally take them, we can really get depressed and have a major lack of energy. The lack of energy to do even things I enjoy bothers me the most of all. We've been taking L-Tyrosine, B-12, and plenty of 5 hour energys to combat the fatigue but it doesnt always help. I was wondering if anyone has any tips on fighting this or is this just part of our consequences? Also, can anyone thats been through this process give me an idea of how long until I start feeling normal? I do understand that it will take time for our bodies to repair and get back to normal working order but I'm just trying to find something to look forward to. I will say that no matter how bad we've felt we haven't talked about going back; we're ready to move on with our lives to bigger and better things."



"Today is Oct 29th 2011. My girlfriend and I have been 100% sober since Oct 21st 2010. Vicodine free! It's been one year and things have been great. We are posting this today to let others know there are other ways to go about being sober. Everyone is different, we get that, but you do not need to humiliate yourself in front of other people and have people look at you different. We were functioning addicts. We went to work everyday, and paid our bills. Nobody knew about our addiction problem, except for the people we would buy from. We decided not to do a "detox program", or go to NA meetings. We had the will power and were determined that our lives were not going to revolve around a pill. If you want it bad enough, you can do it yourself.

One thing that helped me was when I would feel a lack of energy, or just not feeling like I was in good mood, I would get in my truck and go for a ride jamming my favorite music. It would put me in a better mood and give me a boost of energy that I needed. Just keep yourself busy. Get a job if you dont have one. Keep your mind busy. If your mind is busy, you don't have time to think how bored you are, or how much you feel like shit."


Watch out....this could happen to you. :banana: :banana: :banana: :banana:
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:24 pm

more stuff. fell free to post links, or what works for you.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby SoCal » Mon Jul 23, 2012 7:51 am

Im goin through something similar with my 18 yr old daughter who got hooked on the crank line,,ended up doin 120 days in an arkansas prison!,,Hell it was hard for me in there ,,but she had just turned 18 a few days before,,she got screwed big time,,she was asleep in the car(which was hers,,her BF driving), and another friend thought they could just go in this place and take the whole register,,like it aint gonna be bolted down and a million wires connected to ity!,,but hert bf didnt ride the beef like he should have so she got prison time plus she lost her car,!,,anyway,,during those 4 months we got real close by writting and she said she was ready for our workouty,,jog and run after punchin the bag and maybe some dumbell work,,and she hasnt agreed to go to any meetings,,
So when i looked at your list 2 things poped out that i will use,,and thats be completely honest with her,,cause we may be able to get over on some people ,,but not our children,,they know alot more than we'd like them to!,,S0,Yea,,be honest,,and
.BE AN EXAMPLE!,,Im goin to a meeting tonight at 8pm.,,and ill ask her if she wants to go and she'll say no,,and i'll go anyway,,i want to go,,but i really want my daughter there too before she gets mixed up with the wrong people again,,but i cant make he,,so as you said,,i will be an example and hopefully after a few times she'll make the decision she needs some help,,she's very high strung and can go off at the drop of a hat,,she might need medication,,i dont know,,but people dont go from normal into a pscychotic rage in seconds!,,so today i start makin some changes,,ive let her have a good BF spend the week end here,,and he is clean and supposedly gonna keep her away from druggies,,but i just went and woke him up to go to work,,before jess got out he had work everyday,,and i told him she'd still be here when he got off work,,but he hasnt paid me no mind so when he gets up,,im gonna tell him he doesnt come over till after five and i already told them overnight is just for the week ends,,so when he gets up he has to go,,he isnt gonna become a fixture in our home.
But anyway gettin back to example im gonna punch the bag a little and walk run around the lake.either she goes with me or i go alone.,,This excercise along with the meetings are for me cause ive tapered to 3mgs and ive never done that before and thinkin to go to 2 mgs this week,,so if i have a routine already set up ,,maybe when im sick i can continue as best i can even if its just a short walk,,plus my bike ride to the bank every mornin.,,Man,,its been in the 100's this last week,,and not yet 9am and its 80%so we have to do this walk jog stuff early>?
TT
User avatar
SoCal
 
Posts: 4511
Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby Poncho » Fri Jul 27, 2012 11:46 pm

Look at it this way Taperless Tommy, at least your daughter's a working girl which is more then you or that other lazy fuck buddy of yours Zero do everyday. :lol:
Attachments
prostitute.jpg
prostitute.jpg (13.06 KiB) Viewed 3695 times
Poncho
Senior Member
 
Posts: 3168
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2011 10:08 am

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:28 pm

Guest Laura Tompkins explains how attending twelve step programs such as AA or NA can be hazardous to your mental health. Ms Tompkins holds a Master of Arts in Addiction Studies from the Hazelden Graduate School for Addiction Studies.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/harm-reduc ... vity-based
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:59 pm

Treating Chronic Anxiety and Depression through Calming the HPA Axis

Lynne Namka, Ed. D. © 2008





Do you feel chronically stressed with your nervous system on constant overdrive with ruminative thoughts, agitation, anxiety or depression? According to one author, anxiety is characterized by the anticipation of being harmed in the future, whereas fear is the anticipation of being harmed in the present Distress is the awareness of being harmed at this particular moment. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in your brain and body (called the HPA axis) is part of the neuroendocrine system that responds to stress and produces the corticosteroids to deal with the stressors. If you are chronically anxious or depressed, you may be stuck in sympathetic nervous system arousal. Stressful life events such as a serious fall, car accident, surgery, anesthesia, extensive dental procedures, extended periods of hard work, divorce or the loss of a loved one can send the HPA axis off balance. Loss after loss accompanied by trauma can be cumulative which doesn’t give the body time to reset itself back to a normal state.



One article on the HPA axis described it as “a complex set of feedback interactions between the hypothalamus (located in the midbrain), the pituitary (located beneath the brain) and the adrenal glands (located in the kidneys).” The HPA axis is a “major part of the neuroendocrine system that regulates stress responses and maintains the homeostatic condition of autonomic responses directly or indirectly, such as circulation regulation, breathing regulation, feeding behavior, weight control and digestion, immune responses, pain responses, acute stresses and chronic stresses, mood states, sexual/reproductive responses, growth, fluid balance and metabolic energy balances.” With all those functions to monitor and regulate, the HPA is important to understand.



The sensitivity of the HPA axis in handling life stressors is determined through genetics. Some people have a more sensitive temperament which is an inherited trait and therefore are more prone to anxiety. If a sensitive person has childhood trauma, neglect or invalidation, he or she is more susceptible to stress and his or her fight or flight response is easily activated and can be slower than others to calm down.



Research says that there are inherited genes that impair responses to stressors such as exercise, infection, etc. The research on emotional temperament shows that the amount of arousal depends on how your brain and central nervous system react to stress. Sensitive people seem to have quicker and stronger emotional reactions than others who are more stoic and don't react strongly to events. The insula is a tiny part of the brain that processes the sensory information of sight, sound, touch, odors and pain. Brain-imaging studies show that some people have a hyper-responsive reaction to stressful stimuli.


Sympathetic nervous system arousal certainly is a factor in the clients I see with chronic anxiety and depression. Carmine M. Pariante, M.D. studies neuroendocrinology and neuroimaging and has examined the regulation of glucocorticoid secretion and the immune response in depression and in psychosis. “Depression is characterized by an over activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that resembles the neuroendocrine response to stress and ….antidepressants directly regulate HPA axis function.” Recent research has linked hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system to chronic illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, poliomyelitis, chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia.



By learning to work with the biochemistry of your HPA axis when you are upset, you can slow down the fight-or-flight mode to bring yourself back into a calmer, relaxed state of mind. Deep breathing always helps speed the process of relaxation. As I tell children, you can use breath to bring oxygen to your body and your Magic Fingers to tap on your body to make yourself feel better! How you think about your problems certainly makes them better or worse and psychotherapy teaches how to decrease negative thoughts. The Energy Psychology techniques which teach acupressure and deep breathing are quick and easy to do and work to calm the HPA axis. Exercise is another non-drug approach which releases the good brain chemicals, enhances serotonin, stimulates nerve growth and oxygenates the brain.







Supplements, Herbs and Drugs that Reduce Anxiety





Turning the volume control down of the deficiencies and excesses of neurotransmitters of the brain that stimulate pain and stress is a complex process but there are some things you can do. I can’t recommend supplements or herbal remedies because I’m not a medical doctor, but I am allowed to tell you about them. Do a web search to educate yourself about these approaches and talk to your health care practitioner. There are a number of nutrients and drugs that help neutralize the stress-related responses and calm the central nervous system.



The B vitamins have been found to be deficient in some people with anxiety and depression. A good B complex assists the process of energy production and supports a healthy nervous system. Vitamin E, in a natural not synthetic form, has been found to help with memory problems.



Inositol is a food supplement that brings improvement to people with panic, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Levels are low in people with depression and high in euphoric people. Inositol appears quite safe as it is used with newborns with respiratory disease and has been administered to adults in high doses in powder form up to 12 grams a day without toxic side effects. Rich dietary sources are fruits, nuts, beans and grains and Westerners typically get one gram of Inositol per day in their food. Inositol appears to calm neuron hypersensitivity and brain excitability by producing GABA and increasing the density of Dopamine D2 Receptors in the Striatum in the brain. The research shows that it decreases pain, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and increases sleep quality. People with bi-polar illness should not use it as it may produce mania. Lithium depletes Inositol thus bringing down the manic phase of bi-polar illness.



Omega-3 Fatty Acids found in the deep ocean, fatty fish oil, flax seed and chia seed have been shown to help in reducing anxiety and depression. They may also reduce inflammation in the body and assist the liver in processing drugs.



L-Theanine is a fat-soluble amino acid that works to reduce nervous tension and stress. It has also been recommended for ADHD as it stimulates the production of alpha waves associated with a calm, relaxed state. It helps produce GABA in the brain that blocks the release of excitatory neurotransmitters. L-Theanine is the non-energizing component of green tea which is known to deliver mood support and calm the mind. You can get it by drinking several cups of green tea a day or taking it in 50 mg. capsules. Like all amino acids, it should be taken on an empty stomach for better absorption.



GABA is a brain neurotransmitter for stress reduction that keeps the nerve cells from over firing by boosting the inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. A deficiency in GABA might manifest in free-floating anxiety, panic, claustrophobia, ‘burn out’ and an inability to relax. The supplement of GABA can be purchased in health food stores either alone or in combination with other herbal products. It works in the same way as prescription medications such as Valium and other tranquilizers without the fear of addiction. The tranquilizers Valium, Librium, Ativan, Klonopin and Restoril are anti-anxiety drugs that act on GABA functions; however these drugs induce dependence, impair memory and psychomotor performance and dull the intellect according to an article from the American Psychiatric Association. Doses of the supplement GABA range from 100-500 mg. per day for adults and half of that for children. Some people use it temporarily when they are going through a rough time; others find they feel better if they continue it throughout life. One of my clients reported that her severe racing anxiety thoughts decreased when she used an over-the-counter product called GABA Calm which includes some herbs along with GABA.



L-phenylalanine, another amino acid that is used to treat mood symptoms, has also been recommended for people with ADD and ADHD. It aids in memory and learning and decreases pain. It is a precursor to the amino acid l-tyrosine. It should not be taken by people who have high blood pressure. Becalmed is one brand that has been helpful for people.



l-tyrosine supports mental alertness and decreases the stress response. It also has been recommended for people with ADD or ADHD. It helps produce neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine, and synthesizes the thyroid hormone. It should not be take with hyperthyroidism, melanoma or by people taking MAO inhibitors or other mood-altering medications such as Prozac, Paxil, etc.



A number of drugs that work with the dopamine system can calm the excess of excitatory neurotransmitters that are prevalent in people with chronic pain and anxiety. For example, an anti-epileptic drug, Neurontin (Gabapentin) works on GABA by minimizing the effects of excessive incoming stimuli which causes stress on the person.



5-Hydroxy-l-Tryptophan (5-HTP) is a precursor to serotonin which elevates cortisol and the human growth factor. It should not be used with antidepressants due to dysregulation of blood pressure. The dosage for 5-HTP is 50 to 100 mg. with each of the three meals.



S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe) is a naturally-occurring substance in the brain that is a natural mood elevator, increasing the fluidity of cell membranes. It should not be taken for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder as it can increase mania symptoms. SAMe should be taken with extra B vitamins to keep homocysteine levels from elevating. Two hundred to four hundred mg. is the recommended dosage. It elevates the mood, cleans the liver by helping it produce glutathione for detoxification and helps decrease inflammation and pain and maintains flexibility in the joints.



St. John’s Wort has a 2,400 year history of use for “nervous unrest” according to Hippocrates. It is thought to work with several of the neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. St. John’s Wort should not be used by light skinned, blue-eyed people as it may cause photosensitivity to the sun. It can weaken oral birth controls meds. It may take up to twelve weeks for improvement of symptoms (average 4 weeks). The recommended dosage is 900 to 1500 mg. of standardized extract.



Check with your health practitioner before adding 5-HTP, SAMe and St. John’s Wort if you are on antidepressants or anti-anxiety drugs.



Valerian Root, Passion Flower, Hops, Golden Root (also called rhodiola rosea) and Chamomile are herbs that produce a calming effect either alone or in combination. There are many products on the market at health food stores that combine these products for stress and anxiety.



Be aware that you can take too much serotonin. The Serotonin Syndrome is an over excess of serotonin and can cause body symptoms. An increase in jerkiness of the legs can be a symptom of too much serotonin or it can be caused by other factors. Do a web search on this topic if you have concerns about getting too much serotonin.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Wed Feb 26, 2014 12:28 am

Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress
A multisite clinical trial lays groundwork for improving care for mothers and babies affected by opioid dependence.
July 06, 2012
Lori Whitten, NIDA Notes Staff Writer
A NIDA-supported clinical trial, the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study, has found buprenorphine to be a safe and effective alternative to methadone for treating opioid dependence during pregnancy. Women who received either medication experienced similar rates of pregnancy complications and gave birth to infants who were comparable on key indicators of neonatal health and development. Moreover, the infants born to women who received buprenorphine had milder symptoms of neonatal opioid withdrawal than those born to women who received methadone.

Methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy are both widely used to help individuals with opioid dependence achieve and sustain abstinence. Methadone has been the standard of care for the past 40 years for opioid-dependent pregnant women. However, interest is growing in the possible use of buprenorphine, a more recently approved medication, as another option for the treatment of opioid addiction during pregnancy.

“Our findings suggest that buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy has some advantages for infants compared with methadone and is equally safe,” says Dr. Hendrée Jones, who led the multicenter study while at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is now at RTI International.

A Rigorous Trial Design

Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) enhances an opioid-dependent woman’s chances for a trouble-free pregnancy and a healthy baby. Compared with continued opioid abuse, MMT lowers her risk of developing infectious diseases, including hepatitis and HIV; of experiencing pregnancy complications, including spontaneous abortion and miscarriages; and of having a child with challenges including low birth weight and neurobehavioral problems.

Along with these benefits, MMT may also produce a serious adverse effect. Like most drugs, methadone enters fetal circulation via the placenta. The fetus becomes dependent on the medication during gestation and typically experiences withdrawal when it separates from the placental circulation at birth. The symptoms of withdrawal, known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) include hypersensitivity and hyperirritability, tremors, vomiting, respiratory difficulties, poor sleep, and low-grade fevers. Newborns with NAS often require hospitalization and treatment, during which they receive medication (often morphine) in tapering doses to relieve their symptoms while their bodies adapt to becoming opioid-free.

The MOTHER researchers hypothesized that buprenorphine maintenance could yield methadone’s advantages for pregnant women with less neonatal distress. Buprenorphine, like methadone, reduces opioid craving and alleviates withdrawal symptoms without the safety and health risks related to acquiring and abusing drugs. Therapeutic dosing with buprenorphine, as with methadone, avoids the extreme fluctuations in opioid blood concentrations that occur in opioid abuse and place physiological stress on both the mother and the fetus. However, unlike methadone, buprenorphine is a partial rather than full opioid and so might cause less severe fetal opioid dependence than methadone therapy.

The MOTHER study recruited women as they sought treatment for opioid dependence at six treatment centers in the United States and one in Austria. All the women were 6 to 30 weeks pregnant. The research team initiated treatment with morphine for each woman, stabilized her dose, and then followed with the daily administration of buprenorphine therapy or MMT for the remainder of her pregnancy. Throughout the trial, the team increased each woman’s medication dosage as needed to ease withdrawal symptoms.

The study incorporated design features to ensure that its findings would be valid. Among the most notable were measures taken to prevent biases that might arise if staff and participants knew which medication a woman was getting.

To treat the participants without knowing which medication each woman was receiving, the study physicians wrote all prescriptions in pairs, one for each medication, in equivalent strengths. Study pharmacists matched the patient’s name and ID number to her medication group and filled only the prescription for the medication she was taking.

Each day, participants dissolved seven tablets under their tongues and then swallowed a syrup. If a woman was in the buprenorphine group, one or more of her tablets contained that medication, depending on her prescribed dosage, while the rest of the tablets and the syrup were placebos. If a woman was in the methadone group, the syrup contained that medication in her prescribed strength and the tablets all were placebos. In this way, each woman’s complement of medications appeared identical to that of every other participant. The placebo tablets and syrup were crafted to look, taste, and smell like the active medications.

As Good For Mothers, Better for Infants

Of 175 women who started a study medication, 131 continued until they gave birth. Those who received MMT and those given buprenorphine experienced similar pregnancy courses and outcomes. The two groups of women did not differ significantly in maternal weight gain, positive drug screens at birth, percentage of abnormal fetal presentations or need for Cesarean section, need for analgesia during delivery, or serious medical complications at delivery.

As the MOTHER researchers had hypothesized, the infants whose mothers were treated with buprenorphine experienced milder NAS than those infants exposed to methadone (see graph). Whereas most infants in both groups required morphine to control NAS, the buprenorphine group, on average, needed only 11 percent as much, finished its taper in less than half the time, and remained in the hospital roughly half as long as the infants exposed to methadone.

At Dr. Gabriele Fischer’s Medical University of Vienna site in Austria, three women became pregnant for a second time during the time MOTHER was enrolling participants. This development allowed researchers to compare the two medications’ relative safety and efficacy in individual women as well as across groups. During her second pregnancy, each of the three women took the alternative medication to the one she took in her first pregnancy. In each instance, the child born following buprenorphine treatment exhibited milder NAS symptoms than the one born following methadone treatment. This result suggests that differences in the effects of the two medications, rather than women’s individual differences in physiology, underlie the group findings.

“Buprenorphine may be a good option for pregnant women, particularly those who are new to treatment or who become pregnant while on this medication,” says Dr. Jones. “If a patient is on methadone maintenance and stable, however, she should remain on methadone.”

Bar graph shows shorter hospital stays, less time in withdrawal treatment, and lower doses of morphine for the offspring of opioid-dependent women who received buprenorphine rather than methadone during pregnancy.
Next Questions

MOTHER researchers observed that although the women in their buprenorphine and methadone groups benefited equally from treatment, the drop-out rate was higher in the buprenorphine group (33 vs. 18 percent). This difference was not statistically significant. The researchers speculate that if it is meaningful, it may be owing to factors other than different responses to the two medications. They surmise that the experimental treatment protocols may have moved patients from morphine to buprenorphine too rapidly, causing discomfort, or that buprenorphine may have been easier than methadone to discontinue when women decided to become abstinent.

The MOTHER study did not include women with some substance use disorders that are commonly comorbid with opioid abuse. “Future studies should compare neonatal abstinence syndrome, birth outcomes, and maternal outcomes of these two medications for pregnant women who also abuse alcohol and benzodiazepines,” Dr. Jones says.

“The field also needs data on neonatal outcomes when pregnant women are treated with buprenorphine combined with naloxone, the current first-line form of buprenorphine therapy for opioid dependence,” Dr. Jones notes. The MOTHER study administered buprenorphine without naloxone to avoid exposing the fetus to a second medication with potential adverse effects.

“Research challenges remaining after this brilliant study are to determine the factors that resulted in the differential drop-out rates between the two medications,” says Dr. Loretta P. Finnegan, who did pioneering work in the assessment and treatment of NAS. “Additionally, researchers need to conduct followup research on these children to determine the longer term significance of the differences in newborn withdrawal symptoms.” Dr. Finnegan, now president of Finnegan Consulting, was formerly the medical advisor to the director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health.

“Neonatal abstinence syndrome is a terrible experience for infants, and there is a great need to improve care for this condition,” says Dr. Jamie Biswas of NIDA’s Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse. “Dr. Jones’ study is a superb contribution to this area of clinical research, and the robust results should provide more treatment options for a syndrome that affects thousands of infants each year.”

Sources:

Unger, A., et al. Randomized controlled trials in pregnancy: Scientific and ethical aspects. Exposure to different opioid medications during pregnancy in an intra-individual comparison. Addiction 106(7):1355–1362, 2011. Full Text

Jones, H.E., et al. Neonatal abstinence syndrome after methadone or buprenorphine exposure. New England Journal of Medicine 363(24):2320–2331, 2010. Full Text
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:46 pm

10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:06 am

Living the Gentle Life--Part 1: Be Gentle with Yourself
By Sandra L. Brown, MA


"Be gentle with yourself. The rest of your life deserves it." (Sandra L. Brown, MA)

As discussed in previous newsletters, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a trauma-related anxiety disorder, and is often seen as an aftermath constellation of symptoms from pathological love relationships. Exposure to other people's pathology (and the corresponding emotional, physical/sexual abuse) can, and often does, give other people stress disorders, including PTSD. Our psychological and emotional systems are simply not wired for long-term exposure to someone else's abnormal psychology. Often the result is a conglomeration of aftermath symptoms that include PTSD, which is described as 'a normal reaction to an abnormal life event.'

The profound and long-term effects of PTSD create what I refer to as a 'cracked vessel.' The fragmentation caused by the trauma creates a crack in the emotional defense system of the person. While treatment can 'glue the crack back together,' and the vessel can once again function as a vessel, if pressure is applied to the crack, the vase will split apart again. This means that the crack is a stress fracture in the vessel--it's the part of the vessel that is damaged and weakened in that area.

There are numerous types of therapies that can help PTSD. If you have it, or someone you care about has it, you/they should seek treatment. PTSD does not go away by itself, and if left untreated, can worsen. People often have missed the opportunity of treating PTSD when it was still relatively treatable and responsive to therapy. The sooner it's treated, the better the outcome. But any treatment, at any time, can still help PTSD.

However, what is often not recognized is the 'continual' life that must be lived when living with the aftermath of PTSD. Because the cracked vessel can crack again, a gentle and balanced life will relieve a lot of the PTSD symptoms that can linger. I have often seen people who have put a lot of effort into their recovery and NOT put a lot of effort into the quality of a gentle life following treatment. This is a mistake, because going back into a busy and crazy life, or picking another pathological, could reactivate PTSD. As much as people want to 'get back out there,' and think they can return to the life they used to live, often that's not true. Wanting to live like you did in the past or do what you did before does not mean that you will be able to. I know, I know... it ticks you off that the damage is interfering with the person you used to be... before pathology exposure (BPE). But wanting it to be different doesn't make it different. If you have PTSD, you need to know what to realistically expect in your prognosis.

Consequently, many people's anxiety symptoms return if their life is not gentle enough. Much like a 12-step program, 'living one day at a time' is necessary, and understanding your proclivity must be foremost in your mind.

Living the gentle life means reducing your exposure to triggers that can reactivate your PTSD. Only you know what these are. If you don't know, then that's the first goal of therapy--to find your triggers. You can't avoid (or even treat) what you don't know exists.

Triggers are exposures to emotional, physical, sexual, visual, auditory, or kinesthetic reminders that set off anxiety symptoms. These triggers could be people, places, objects, sounds, phrases (songs!), tastes, or smells which reconnect you to your trauma. Once you are reconnected to your trauma, your physical body reacts by pumping out the adrenaline and you become hyper-aroused, which is known as hyper-vigilance. This increases paranoia, insomnia, startle reflex and a lot of other overstimulated and anxiety-oriented behaviors.

Other triggers that are not trauma-specific, but you should be on the alert for, are violent movies, TV, or music, and high-level noises. Also, be alert to lifestyle/jobs/people that are too fast-paced, busy environments, risky or scary jobs, bosses or co-workers who have personality disorders and are abrasive, or any other situations that kick-start your anxiety. Women are often surprised that other people's pathology now sets them off. Once they have been exposed to pathology and have acquired PTSD from this exposure, other pathology can trigger PTSD symptoms. Living 'pathology free' is nearly mandatory--to the degree that you can 'un-expose' yourself to other known pathologies.

The opposite of chronic exposure to craziness and pathology would be the gentle life. Think 'zen retreat center'--a subdued environment where your senses can rest... where a body that has been pumped up with adrenaline can let down... and a mind that races can relax. Where the video flashbacks can go on pause, and fast-paced chest panting can turn into slow, diaphragmatic breathing. Where darting eyes can close, soft scents soothe, and gentle music lulls. Where high heels come off and flip-flops go on. Where long quiet walks give way to tension release ... quieting of the mind chases off the demons of hyperactive thinking... so when you whisper, you can hear yourself.

Only, this isn't a retreat center for a yearly visit... this is your life, where your recovery and your need for all things gentle are center in your life. It doesn't mean you need to quit your job or move to a mountain, but it does mean that you attend to your over-stimulated physical body. Those things in your life that you can control, such as the tranquility of your environment, need to be adjusted. Lifestyle adjustments ARE required for those who want to avoid reactivating anxiety. This includes psychological/emotional, physical, sexual, and spiritual self-care techniques.

The one thing you can count on about PTSD, is when you aren't taking care of yourself, your body will SCREAM IT! Your life cannot be the crazy-filled life you may watch others live. Your need for exercise, quiet, healthy food, spirituality, tension release, and joy are as necessary as oxygen for someone with PTSD. Walking the gentle path is your best guard against more anxiety, and your best advocate for peace.

Because of this overwhelming need, The Institute offers retreats several times a year that focus on understanding your PTSD. Watch for announcements in future newsletters.


© http://www.saferelationshipsmagazine.com
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby True85 » Tue Aug 19, 2014 7:48 pm

When did the cravings end for y'all. I am 2 years clean and still craving opiates. Its like I cannot help it. I will not do them, but I still crave them constantly. Its not a craving per say more like a panic and fear. I don't know I am confused, but all and all I am better just pissed off. I am starting to believe more and more people like this. Just watch last 20 minutes of video if you do not feel like watching the whole thing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hz6-2NwRzE
True85
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Wed May 30, 2012 5:26 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Thu Mar 05, 2015 11:18 am

Excellent news....fuck you big pharma!


http://theweek.com/articles/541564/how- ... al-company
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Endorphins from Food

Postby cheeps » Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:33 am

http://www.drjondunnnewsletters.com/New ... Food1.html

Each of these stimulates either inhibitory or excitatory neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain which cause feelings of satisfaction or discontent and moods of joy, happiness, anger, depression, confusion and anxiety. Food indeed is our medicine.

If you find yourself eating to energize, to lift a mood, to calm a hurt or ease a pain then you may be self medicating by supplying and stimulating specific amino acid activity in the brain. Whether its illegal drugs like cocaine or legal ones like chocolate or turkey the amino acid activity of these natural compounds are what create our mood. Proper understanding and manipulation of amino acids as found in our food or in concentrated supplements can profoundly impact our moods, equal to and often more reliably and safely then prescription drugs. Four categories of amino acids are responsible for most of the highs and lows we experience.

Serotonin
Serotonin is one of the most studied inhibitory neurotransmitters, found not only in the brain but in large quantities in the digestive system. If you eat to get a mood lift you may be serotonin deficient.

Serotonin deficiency will often result in those late day cravings for sweets or other mood modifiers such as alcohol and marijuana. A deficiency of this important inhibitory neurotransmitter may show with thinking which is negative, obsessive and worried. Poor self esteem may result with individuals becoming shy, fearful, irritable and prone to panic attacks. Sleep problems are common, along with aches like fibromyalgia and an aversion to hot weather may aggravate symptoms.

Lack of bright light which is a hallmark of seasonal affective disorder will further diminish and aggravate serotonin deficient symptoms. Caffeine, diet sweetened drinks, stress and lack of exercise also diminish serotonin levels. Serotonin deficit will occur if there is a lack of healthy dietary protein intake from food such as ocean going fish, organic eggs, and organic chicken or healthy vegetarian protein sources such as mixed nuts, seeds, grains and legumes. Healthy fats found in these organic foods provide additional support for ensuring healthy serotonin levels.

You can raise your serotonin levels by supplementing with the amino acid tryptophan or its derivative 5 Hydroxytryptophan (5HTP). I prefer 5HTP because it works for most everyone. However, each person is different so experimentation is warranted, if you don’t respond favorably to one try the other. The typical dose for tryptophan is 500mg up to three times a day and for 5HTP 25-100mg one to three times a day as needed. You should feel benefit within 15 to 20 minutes of taking this amino acid lasting 3-6 hours.

Catecholamines
You have three catecholamines: dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine or adrenaline. Norepinephrine and adrenaline are made from dopamine. These three are excitatory neurotransmitters. Catecholamine deficiency will fuel one’s hunger for high octane stimulants such as caffeine, chocolate, NutraSweet and cocaine type drugs. It is interesting to note that while alcohol, tobacco and marijuana typically act to slow a person down, these people get a lift from such drugs.

The above drugs, including pharmaceutical antidepressants, are really just messengers stimulating the brain to produce more catecholamines. If the catecholamines are in short supply to begin with, stimulation by drugs of any type will only bring dependency and disillusion.

Deficiency may result from too much stress (too much fighting), high carbohydrate or low calorie diet, lack of exercise and hormonal deficiency i.e. menopause. The catecholamine deficient person may experience depression, low energy and poor focus such as that found with attention deficit disorder. A serotonin deficient depression generally shows with more energy then the type of depression found in this group of individuals.

If food gives you a significant energy boost and improved focus you may be tyrosine deficient. Tyrosine is the amino acid used to create dopamine. Tyrosine is also needed to create thyroid hormone, whose deficiency can mimic a catecholamine deficiency.

Like serotonin, tyrosine is found in our diet, especially cheese and other high protein foods such as fish and eggs. Supplements are generally dosed at 500-1,000mg early in the morning and again in the late morning if needed. You should see benefit within a few days. It is important to remember that you are not looking for another drug, so use tyrosine only as long as you need to for getting back in balance while addressing those lifestyle habits that caused the deficiency to begin with.

Use caution with tyrosine if you have high blood pressure, are bipolar (manic depressive) or troubled by migraines.

GABA
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the brain’s main inhibitory neurotransmitter for putting on the breaks. Overexcited states mark a GABA deficiency with feelings of being wired, stressed, overwhelmed, pressured, uptight, physically tense, easily frustrated, and snappy.

If you eat to calm yourself you may be GABA deficient. Hypoglycemia, the tendency to not do well if you go too long without food, may indicate GABA deficiency. Food sources for GABA are the same as those above.

If you wish to supplement, typical dosing is 100-500mg one to three times a day. Use caution if you have low blood pressure.

Endorphins
Endorphins include about 15 different neurotransmitters which give us a sense of pleasure and reduced pain. Deficiency of endorphins may show with oversensitivity states such as crying easily, difficulty getting over a loss and oversensitivity to pain. There may be a history of chronic pain. If you eat to soothe sensitive feelings you may be endorphin deficient.

Natural endorphin elevators include: sun, nature, romance, music and exercise. Regarding exercise, beware of the addictive state where you exercise in spite of your health and well-being to get that endorphin fix.

These individuals often crave indulgences such as bread, cheese, wine, marijuana, tobacco, lattes and chocolate. Chocolate contains quite a smorgasbord of mood altering chemicals including: theobromine, caffeine, slasolinol, phenylethylamine and amandamide (marijuana like cannabinoid neurotransmitter). I often recommend endorphin elevating amino acids to help break these habits.

It takes a multitude of amino acids and essential fatty acids for the body to make endorphins, so a well rounded diet is very important with ample adequate protein intake. The most common supplement to raise endorphins is phenylalanine (PA). There are two forms; D and L.

Use DLPA if you need more energy with your mood elevation. Dosage ranges are from 500-1,000 mg of equal parts D&L phenylalanine before breakfast and again at mid-morning if needed.

Use DPA instead of DLPA if you don’t want to be too stimulated and or if you tend to headaches, high blood pressure, insomnia, penylketonuria (PKU), Parkinson's disease, bipolar disorder or have a personal or family history of melanoma.
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

chronic pain resource

Postby cheeps » Mon Jul 27, 2015 3:38 pm

This technique is old and PT's use it in their work. Very interesting to me...

http://www.alexandervideo.com/
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby amery2u » Fri Sep 11, 2015 9:06 pm

AMAZING.

NEEDS BUMPED UP~

THANK YOU;
FIRST TIME I'VE READ THIS, CHEEPERS.

WOW. SHEESH.
Sub-Free Since Easter Sunday~ 4/11/2015 . . and still fighting . I AM NOT YOUR ONLY WHEELS, I AM THE HIGHWAY..~
User avatar
amery2u
 
Posts: 1116
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:20 am
Location: Ohio

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby cheeps » Mon Jun 13, 2016 7:02 pm

Sounds good, hope the treatment is good as says. The 28 day hole I went to was pitiful.




http://www.marylandaddictionrecovery.co ... rica-years
10 yrs on methadone
Meth free 10/08
Back surgery 5/12/14
Knee surgery 9/19/14
Oxy free 12/06/14
2017 taper in progress
User avatar
cheeps
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 8755
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 1:15 pm

Re: articles and blurbs go here

Postby subspouse » Tue Jun 14, 2016 11:16 am

thank you cheeps...the pregnancy one filled a few gaps for me. bless you for all the work you do
subspouse
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 8:44 am

Next

Return to Staying Clean

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest